If you’re trapped with a damp tent and you are wondering what you can do to place a tent inside a dryer?

The quick solution to that is no, not even if you have set the item to dry in a tumbler.

Why Can’t You Put Your Tent in the Dryer

The best way to store your gear is by making sure it’s dry before putting away. Mold can grow on wet clothes and ruin them if you don’t take care of the problem early enough. You might be wondering whether or not drying certain pieces in an airtight container will work, but unfortunately this too may cause damage due to termites getting into seams while everything is hot from being taken out just once definitely do NOT put anything with delicate fabric like tents inside any type of dryer.

Instead of putting your tent in the dryer, you’ll have to find other methods for making sure it’s free from moisture before storing. We’ll discuss different ways that can help with this and pros/cons associated each one.

Best Way to Dry Your Tent 

The best way to dry a tent after camping is by hanging it outside on the clothesline with direct sunlight and little wind. This helps prevents potential damage from occurring due in part because there’s less contact between water/moisture inside of your home away from Mother Nature herself.

The clothesline is a classic method of drying your tent after you’ve been camping. If it’s not available, try draping or hanging up the wet shelter over something sturdy like fencing and make sure that there are no trees within reach which might catch fire because this could ruin all chances for saving anything inside. Pitching in sunny weather works best by getting rid off moisture quickly while also checking if any damage has occurred during transport.

Putting a tent in the dryer is never a good idea! The heat from your clothes might damage it enough to make them leak or rip apart. Especially with tents made out of mesh material, which can easily become damaged by exposure.

How Dry Does The Tent Have To Be?

Your tent must be dry and clean before you can store it. The end of the story.

Initial thoughts of packing away your tent are tempting, but even slightly damp conditions can lead to mildew and a horrible smell. The longer you leave it before drying out the faster this will happen so don’t put off maintenance for too long.

The least of your worries is a bad smell, but if you pack away wet tents. Mold can form on the fabric and destroy its waterproof coating which will weaken it over time as well causing leaks or tears in this process. There’s nothing that claims to reduce effects from mildew.

When packing your tent away, make sure it is bone dry. If not quite convinced that the water has been removed from inside and outside of your sheltering space then leave out to continue drying for a while longer than necessary this will ensure minimal damage due in ultimately forgetting about such matters when getting ready leaves again.

Ways to Make Your Tent Dry When Camping

Although, if you don’t want to camp indoors it’s impossible to ensure that your tent stays completely dry. However But there are ways you can keep it from becoming wet. This could reduce the amount of time it takes to get it dry.

  • Make sure to set your tent in an elevated spot, with the tent footprint or tarp footprint of the tent completely under it (the footprint or tarp should not be visible beyond the top part of your tent)
  • Seek out areas that have natural rain blocks like in alcoves or under trees.
  • Think about hanging a tarp on top of your tent at an angle (directed downwards from the tent).
  • Do not wear wet clothes or shoes inside your tent. You might want to consider a tent with an entrance or an roof tarp for a dry buffer zone near the entry point to your camp.

Is It Possible To Dry a Tent Indoors

If you reside in an area that has a particularly bad weather pattern or are expecting an incoming storm when making your tent dry, you may think about drying your tent inside. This could be difficult if you live within an area that is small, as you’ll need to locate an area where you can hang the tent such as a clothesline that you can make in garage. If nothing else works the shower rod can be a fantastic place to dry your tent particularly if the tent is constantly drip watering, as bathrooms are built to handle water.

If you can find an appropriate spot for your tent to be hung then the next thing to do is to set the perfect conditions to allow drying. It’s possible to hang the tent in the bathroom and then wait however, it may take some time, and you may want to shower at some point.

Since mildly windy, warm conditions that are low in humidity are perfect to dry tents you’ll need to replicate those conditions highest of your abilities within your home. One way to accomplish this is to invest in an insignificant space heater as well as an air conditioner.

If you plug both into the same outlet and then set them up with the tent (being careful not to move the heating away enough away from the tent to prevent it from being damaged) then you’ve generated the heat and wind needed to dry. In the event that you are drying out your tent within the bathroom, we recommend closing the door and turning off the exhaust fan running to lower the humidity inside the room.

 

Conclusion

When you hang your tent outside to dry, make sure it’s sunny and warm. Don’t put in the dryer because that will ruin any chance of keeping its waterproofing up. You can also try hanging near an open garage or bathroom where there are no windows for protection against rainwater seeping into materials like canvas fibers (which would cause mold).

Be aware that if you care for your tent it will be there for you for many years to follow.

By Anthony Paton

Anthony Paton, the outdoorsman who loves to report all sorts of interesting stories about camping in Great Britain. He's based out London and doesn't get much time for himself these days because work commitments keep him away on occasion but does what he can with what little free time there is.